Some Tips For Success With Nylon Plastic

Posted: June 29, 2017 in Acetal, Nylon
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Nylon is a fairly popular plastic used by the DIY community: and it should be! Versatile, strong, and available in small quantities it offers many properties valuable to the public’s plastic applications. In most cases, nylon will be an ideal material for mechanical parts such as sheaves or bushings. But it isn’t perfect and it like anything it has its drawbacks in certain applications. Here are some tips on using nylon that will serve you well.

1.) Don’t use it in the cold

Ok, well you can but you just need to be aware of impact. Nylon gets brittle in the cold, at about 5 degrees Fahrenheit and if it’s taking any sort of impact it could break. In fact in  any application where you expect impact, use Redco Tuffkast instead (it has been developed to replace nylon in applications with impact.)

2.) Don’t use it in water

Unlike most plastics, nylon absorbs a significant amount of water – up to 4% of its volume in 24 hour saturation. For marine applications or those involving tight tolerances you probably want to go with an alternative material. Acetal is commonly specified in this case but Tuffkast may be an option as well, it depends on the application, so ask your distributor.

3.) Do use it under load

Nylon can handle 4000 PSI in application and this is one of the highest loads of readily available thermoplastics. This makes nylon excellent as a bearing, sheave, or other load bearing part.

4.) Pick the optimal grade

Nylon isn’t just “nylon”. It’s available with a variety of fillers: glass for dimensional stability, moly for high load low RPM applications, oil filled for reduced friction, UV stabilizers for outdoor use, and PVM (pressure velocity maximum) for the highest load applications. These fillers add only a minor cost, or in some cases cost the same as the natural grade, and are well worth it for certain applications. Unsure if you need a filler? Discuss your application with your distributor.

Even though three of these four tips are “don’ts” knowing when to avoid a material is just as important as knowing when to use it! Don’t get us wrong – nylon is a versatile, excellent, affordable plastic for a wide range of applications. Just keep in mind that it has advantages and drawbacks: just like every other material out there.

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