Sheave Design: Advanced

Posted: August 9, 2017 in Education
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On our previous post we taught you the bare minimum that is required to design a simple sheave. Now, we’re going to discuss some ways to add advanced features to your sheave. Firstly, is how to calculate webbing. “Webbing” in regards to a sheave is removing material outside of the hub and outer diameter to lower the overall weight of the sheave. A webbed sheave would look like this:

 

 

 

 

But how do you know how much material you can machine off? The math is actually quite simple: W = 1.2r where W is the “minimum web thickness” and “r” is the radius of the rope or cable. So for example, based off a 1″ diameter rope the minimum web thickness is 1.2″. This naturally segways us into a discussion about the hub. As you can see in the picture of the webbed sheave, the hub has to be wider than the webbing. But by how much? Again, the math is simple: H = 1.5b where H is the “hub width” and b is the bore size. Lets assume the bore is 1″ again, you would then require a hub no thinner than 1.5″. Typically the hub is at the very least as wide or wider than the rim, so always run off that rule of thumb.

Finally, the last calculation is to figure out a press fit if you’re going to push a bearing into your sheave bore. You need to know how to precisely bore but leave just enough room that the bearing won’t slide around. That is done as follows:

 

This will give you the bore diameter you require to fit your bearing. You now have all the tools to make not only a sheave but a fairly complex one if you’re so inclined. If you want to download the whole Redwood Plastics sheave design manual, where this information was taken, you may do so here.

If you need a quotation on some sheaves or sheave materials please contact Redwood Plastics.

 

 

 

 

 

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