Posts Tagged ‘DIY’

Something a little different today. We found a short (3-1/2 minutes) video tutorial on how to make a corn starch based bioplastic. None of the ingredients are toxic and most are what you would have around the house. It’s easy to make, simply requiring a pot and heating element. It’s a good introduction into the world of bioplastics which is a rapidly growing segment of the plastic market. Large companies such as soda pop manufacturers and other food processors that currently use a lot of plastics in their packaging are looking for biodegradable and environmentally-friendly plastic options.

This particular project would seem best for children interested in science. The goopy starch-based plastic can be used in simple molds or laid across stencils but it doesn’t seem practical for too many functional products. Its resistance to wear and properties seem to be similar to LDPE once cooled. To be honest the examples that the host of the video shows at the end are…Underwhelming. But since the basic mixture for this plastic is so easy to do it would hopefully inspire in your mind some better things to do with it.

We’ve posted the video here:

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FRP wall panels are a great product for the DIY community. The panels are strong, long-lasting, grime and vandalism resistant. Excellent for applications such as bathrooms, garages, “mud rooms”, or areas animals are kept. FRP wall panels have a relatively economical cost compared to industrial FRP panels, are widely available, and easy to install. As with any project, preparation is key to saving money and prevent disappointment with the final result.

To start the first thing you want to do is draw a quick sketch of the area to be covered. Mark each wall with how many feet it is in length. FRP wall panels come in 4′ x 8′ and 4′ x 10′ panels and the next thing you need to do is figure out how you will orientate the panels. Start at the floor – will they be arranged to provide more height by being set side-to-side by their width? or by their length to provide 4′ high coverage? In many applications, the panels can be placed on their side to cover more area and reduce costs. You should now be able to figure out how many panels you need.

Next, figure out how much FRP adhesive you need. The adhesive comes in 4 gallon buckets and covers 200 square feet. simply add up the total area of the panels you need and divide by 200. For example, if your project requires 12 4′ x 10′ panels that is 480 square feet / 200 = 2.4 or 3 buckets of adhesive will be needed. It’s always good to have some extra so never round down!

Following this step you need to figure out how many inside corners/outside corners/j-trims you need. Inside corners and outside corners are PVC plastic dividers for FRP wall panel that are purchased alongside the panels. This is pretty simple as you just count how many corners you have. The trims and corners all come in 10′ lengths. The j-trims require a bit more thought. These are also PVC but are used to join two panels where there are no corners. You need to be able to sketch or visualize where your panels will buttress up against each other along the stretches of wall and be able to count up what you need.

And that’s pretty much it! At this point you should have a clear idea of the scope of your project and all the requirements for your FRP panels and how many accessories you need. The next step is to simply contact your plastics distributor and request a quotation. Please give clear and specific requests including relevant quantities for all required components. That will ensure a quick and accurate quotation.

 

So you’re a “DIY’er” at heart. You want to make your own plastic sheaves but don’t know where to start. You’re not sure what material or grade is best for your application and you don’t know what is the minimum amount of “engineering” needed to make or procure a plastic sheave? This write-up will help you through that process.

First of all, material. Assuming your sheave is not going to take a lot of impact and is not used in a wet environment go with moly-filled nylon. This is the same nylon used on crane sheaves and is optimized for low-RPM, high load applications. If your sheave will take impact or be used in a wet environment we would recommend Redco Tuffkast. This is a co-polymer material which overcomes many deficiencies in nylon: Tuffkast can take impact and is better in wet or cold environments. It is more expensive than nylon, however.

After material selection you need to know these basics for the simplest design (a non-webbed, bearing-less sheave):

  • Bore diameter of the center hole.
  • diameter of the rope or cable to be used on the sheave.
  • Overall diameter of the sheave

Next you’ll have to do some very simple math. Firstly, to figure out how deep the groove in the sheave should be: (rope/cable diameter) x 1.75. This will give you the minimum groove depth you need, but in most cases just round to make it a little deeper and give yourself a safety margin. For example, if your sheave is 15″ in total diameter and you have a 1″ diameter cable. That is 1″ x 1.75 = for a required depth of 1.75″. But for the sake of safety margin you can make this an even 2″. The inner diameter of the sheave is now 11″. Please note that for the inner diameter you are taking that required groove depth x 2.

The last thing you need to consider is the thickness of the sheave. For most smaller sheaves just go with a 1/4″ wall thickness, these are the “shoulders” of the sheave on either side of the rope groove. So, for example, if your rope groove is 1″ wide, then you add another 1/2″ for the walls (wall thickness x 2) so you would have an overall thickness of 1.5″. The last thing to touch on here is the radius of the rope groove (the curve of the groove the rope sits in). this is almost always 30 degree and in rare cases, 45 degrees. Run with 30 degrees as a standard.

There are some guidelines for figuring out parameters for more advanced sheaves such as webbing or thickening the hub and we’ll discuss those next time in “Sheave Design: Advanced”.

For help with your sheave applications and to purchase sheave materials please contact Redwood Plastics.

 

We have an unspoken rule we’re about to break here. This blog is about connecting the “do it yourself” (DIY) community with industrial plastics. Plastics that are not very well known outside of their specific industries, but offer a lot to the home handywoman or handyman. Industrial plastics are also known as “engineering” plastics and are a separate grade of materials than what makes up most consumer products. But we were trying to find a new application for summer and stumbled on something with “commodity” plastics, IE. plastic bottles, we wanted to share. Pretty sure this application would be difficult to do with the usual industrial grade sheet/rod/tube…And hey, it promotes plastics recycling! Always a good thing.

It’s a home-made “air cooler” using nothing but Sprite bottles, tubing, a drill, a few pieces of wire, a glue gun, and an oscillating fan. We haven’t tested it (like most applications we highlight) so don’t take our word for how good it works. It’s a short video we wanted to share as North America starts to experience the heat waves that hit with late spring and summer. One change we’re confidant in recommending; however, is the use of a 2 liter bottle as the drain bottle strapped to the fan (you’ll see in the video) as it makes little sense to have two one liter bottles both drain into another one liter bottle. Based on the volumes at play, that would result in a bit too many times having to get up and drain! The full video is below and is about four minutes long, hopefully it works for you!

One of the few PTFE applications that brings in the DIY community consistantly to a plastics distributor is the application using sheet material cut into discs as mountings for telescopes. PTFE is the third slickest solid known to man and works well as a sliding surface. It does have very low load-bearing capabilities and is subject to “creep” (dimensional changes at rest) and also cannot handle much wear at all. In short, there are only specific instances the material makes sense – especially due to its high cost compared to most other plastics used in DIY applications.

We recently came across a blog posting from an amateur astronomer (“Chris B.”) chronicling his progress in making telescope mountings from PTFE. He gives some pretty handy tips such as how to cut the material precisely into the desired disc and to keep it from moving around. We don’t really have experience in this area so it’s probably best to let Chris’ work speak for itself. You can find the blog here: https://fullerscopes.blogspot.ca/2016/08/2-shaft-mouting-pt28-ptfe-clutch.html

We found a great little video on YouTube by user “Make:” which in just three minutes (before credits) gives all sorts of great tips for the DIYer using acrylic in their applications. It starts off with a good point that not everyone knows: acrylic comes in both cast and extruded forms. Yes, they have differences that are important in an application. Yes, there is a difference in cost. Other important tips include how to thermoform, glue, and most importantly – drill, the plastic. Drilling is especially important as the plastic can crack easily, so using lubrication and a soft touch is essential to prevent a wasted part. It will help you answer some questions you didn’t even know to ask prior to diving in: do you have all the materials you need? How are you planning to smooth the edges of the acrylic?

We’ll let the video do the rest of the talking:

UHMWPE (Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene) often abbreviated as “UHMW” is one of the most popular and well known industrial plastics. UHMW is seen as a “Jack of All Trades” in many applications while being more available and less expensive than other plastic options. While this is true to a degree, UHMW has limitations that means it will not solve all problems in all situations. In fact, it has some properties which make it deficient and the “DIY” community should keep this in mind.

When to use UHMW:

UHMW excels at taking impact and it is virtually unbreakable, it’s also very slick and the colder the operating temperature is, the better it performs. This is why UHMW is so popular in applications such as toboggans or as rails on sleds: impact + cold + slickness are all important to the application, and it does really well in this application. UHMW is also easy to work with as it drills, saws, and lathes well. It functions as wear pads, sliding blocks, fenders, and in other impact absorbing applications.

When NOT to use UHMW:

The main application we here at Redwood Plastics see UHMW incorrectly used in is bearing applications. UHMW is a poor choice as a bearing for two reasons:

1.) it is difficult to machine to tight tolerances (+-) 0.02″ are the best you can usually hope for and

2.) UHMW has low load bearing capabilities (500-800PSI). In a DIY bearing application nylon or Tuffkast will be superior.

The issue with tolerances is important to hit home: UHMW is not a dimensionally stable material. Not just compared to metals but even compared to many other plastics. We regularly receive drawings and requests for UHMW parts where we cannot quote based off the requested tolerances (or have to get a written waiver for acceptable tolerances). This lack of dimensional stability extends to thermal expansion and contraction which is why it is so hard to guarantee tolerances: if the part is manufactured in 30 degree weather but used in 90 degree heat the dimensions of the UHMW will drastically change!

We hope this points you in the right direction if UHMW is or isn’t right for your project. But if you have questions, or might be wondering what an alternative material could be, please contact us and we’d be glad to help!