Posts Tagged ‘DIY’

Matting For Your Workshop

Posted: February 14, 2018 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , ,

This posting is going to be a little different than the others. We’re not talking about plastic for a specific project but instead about the comfort of your own “DIY” workstation or workshop.  If you’re like us, you’ll be spending long hours standing as you machine and fabricate your various projects. Do your feet ever get sore? Do you get lower back or joint pain? How about even Plantar’s Fasciitis on your feet?

The reality is for a long day’s work in the shop you need to take care of yourself. Investing is specially designed rubber “ortho” matting such as Redwood Plastics and Rubber’s line of Redco™ Protivity™ Specialty Floor Matting would be a good choice. The first two options of matting “Checkout Comfort” and the premium “Anti-Fatigue”. These function by reducing strain and pain for people having to stand for long periods. They also are finely textured, which will reduce slip and fall risks.

Another interesting member of the matting series is the “ShockGuard” mat. This mat serves to prevent people from receiving high voltage shocks and is compliant with ASTM D-178-81. A certificate can be included with the order. There are other mats available that could serve a purpose for the “DIY” community, for example if you’re building a home gym, there is a “Sport Floor” option that is highly impact resistant.

For more information on these products contact Redwood Plastics and Rubber.

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For members of the public PTFE (polytetraflouroethylene) and UHMW (ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene) seem to be very similar materials. They’re both white, soft, food-safe, and widely available from plastic companies. But are they that different? Oh yes they are! The first thing you would notice is the price. PTFE is literally in another category of plastics called the “high performance” plastics. This means the cost is going to be much higher than UHMW. So when do you need PTFE?

It would be an application where slickness is important above all other factors. UHMW, while less expensive, will outwear, outbear, and outperform PTFE in tough mechanical applications like homemade bushings, cutting board, etc. PTFE is very soft, so soft in fact it suffers from something called “cold flow”. This means that PTFE slowly creeps like a semi-solid liquid almost just sitting at rest in room temperature doing nothing. What PTFE does have in addition to outstanding slickness (low coefficient of friction) is that it takes very high temperatures up to 500 degrees Fahrenheit. UHMW does poorly in high temperatures and cannot handle more than 180 degrees Fahrenheit.

To be honest, in most DIY applications that call for a white plastic with balanced properties UHMW is going to be your go to. It’s too available, too cheap, and too balanced to go with PTFE. But in certain situations where very low friction is required (telescope mounts for example) or high heat will be encountered – PTFE may be your only choice.

For more assistance with your application please contact Redwood Plastics and Rubber.

Many members of the “DIY” community are attracted to the concept of plastic lumber. Usually made from recycled materials it carries both benefits to the environment by using less new material. In addition, plastic lumber can be manufactured in grades that are much stronger than regular wood. Most grades of plastic lumber are UV stable and involve much less maintenance than wood. They will not require repainting, will hold their color, will not rot or splinter, and will not come under insect attack.

However, with everything there is a “catch”. In the case of plastic lumber it’s the price and delivery. The problem comes down to two factors 1.) customers assume that plastic lumber is widely stocked in the available colors, sizes, and profiles they see on the internet. 2.) Customers assume that plastic lumber is, well, “it’s just plastic”. What people do not often understand is that many plastics, including plastic lumber, are not considered the “commodity” grade of plastics that the public usually encounters in everyday life. Commodity plastics make up consumer items, what’s in your car, your toys, your kitchen. Plastics are actually available in not one but three higher quality grades above “commodity” (yes, the actual grade of plastics used in consumer items is called ‘commodity’). The other three grades are, from lower to top, engineering, high-performance, and imidized.

The DIY crowd will usually only encounter high-performance plastics in PTFE, which is used in items like telescope mounts. They will never encounter the ultra-expensive and hard to obtain imidized plastics. What you need to understand is plastic lumber falls into the engineering grade of plastic and the most commonly quoted grade, fiberglass reinforced, is at the upper end of engineering grade plastic cost.

What are we getting at here?

You need to understand that the cost of plastic lumber vs. equivalent wood will be approximately 8-10x the cost of wood! We’re just stating the facts here, folks. Plastic lumber is not “just plastic” in the way a milk jug is. These plastics are considered a premium, specialty building material, which is why you see them in so many cool applications! It needs to be a great application to be worth the cost! The reason we provided a range on cost is that the color of the lumber actually plays significantly into the cost. Black is the least expensive, followed by wood tones, and finally really off-wood colors such as yellow or white. the difference is about 30% across the spread.

So when do you go for plastic lumber?

First of all, you need to be realistic about the cost. In addition to the lumber’s cost it likely will need to be shipped in from the manufacturing plant and this can easily cost several hundred dollars. You need to be realistic that the lumber will not get to you within a day or two (getting it on site in a month is typical). Finally you need to be realistic about your project. Hey, we love plastic here, but it has it’s time and place. If you want a premium, low-maintenance building material for your project, great, splurge and make your dream project come true! The issue is you need to have the facts on hand and analyze whether or not plastic lumber actually fits your needs.

 

 

Something a little different today. We found a short (3-1/2 minutes) video tutorial on how to make a corn starch based bioplastic. None of the ingredients are toxic and most are what you would have around the house. It’s easy to make, simply requiring a pot and heating element. It’s a good introduction into the world of bioplastics which is a rapidly growing segment of the plastic market. Large companies such as soda pop manufacturers and other food processors that currently use a lot of plastics in their packaging are looking for biodegradable and environmentally-friendly plastic options.

This particular project would seem best for children interested in science. The goopy starch-based plastic can be used in simple molds or laid across stencils but it doesn’t seem practical for too many functional products. Its resistance to wear and properties seem to be similar to LDPE once cooled. To be honest the examples that the host of the video shows at the end are…Underwhelming. But since the basic mixture for this plastic is so easy to do it would hopefully inspire in your mind some better things to do with it.

We’ve posted the video here:

FRP wall panels are a great product for the DIY community. The panels are strong, long-lasting, grime and vandalism resistant. Excellent for applications such as bathrooms, garages, “mud rooms”, or areas animals are kept. FRP wall panels have a relatively economical cost compared to industrial FRP panels, are widely available, and easy to install. As with any project, preparation is key to saving money and prevent disappointment with the final result.

To start the first thing you want to do is draw a quick sketch of the area to be covered. Mark each wall with how many feet it is in length. FRP wall panels come in 4′ x 8′ and 4′ x 10′ panels and the next thing you need to do is figure out how you will orientate the panels. Start at the floor – will they be arranged to provide more height by being set side-to-side by their width? or by their length to provide 4′ high coverage? In many applications, the panels can be placed on their side to cover more area and reduce costs. You should now be able to figure out how many panels you need.

Next, figure out how much FRP adhesive you need. The adhesive comes in 4 gallon buckets and covers 200 square feet. simply add up the total area of the panels you need and divide by 200. For example, if your project requires 12 4′ x 10′ panels that is 480 square feet / 200 = 2.4 or 3 buckets of adhesive will be needed. It’s always good to have some extra so never round down!

Following this step you need to figure out how many inside corners/outside corners/j-trims you need. Inside corners and outside corners are PVC plastic dividers for FRP wall panel that are purchased alongside the panels. This is pretty simple as you just count how many corners you have. The trims and corners all come in 10′ lengths. The j-trims require a bit more thought. These are also PVC but are used to join two panels where there are no corners. You need to be able to sketch or visualize where your panels will buttress up against each other along the stretches of wall and be able to count up what you need.

And that’s pretty much it! At this point you should have a clear idea of the scope of your project and all the requirements for your FRP panels and how many accessories you need. The next step is to simply contact your plastics distributor and request a quotation. Please give clear and specific requests including relevant quantities for all required components. That will ensure a quick and accurate quotation.

 

So you’re a “DIY’er” at heart. You want to make your own plastic sheaves but don’t know where to start. You’re not sure what material or grade is best for your application and you don’t know what is the minimum amount of “engineering” needed to make or procure a plastic sheave? This write-up will help you through that process.

First of all, material. Assuming your sheave is not going to take a lot of impact and is not used in a wet environment go with moly-filled nylon. This is the same nylon used on crane sheaves and is optimized for low-RPM, high load applications. If your sheave will take impact or be used in a wet environment we would recommend Redco Tuffkast. This is a co-polymer material which overcomes many deficiencies in nylon: Tuffkast can take impact and is better in wet or cold environments. It is more expensive than nylon, however.

After material selection you need to know these basics for the simplest design (a non-webbed, bearing-less sheave):

  • Bore diameter of the center hole.
  • diameter of the rope or cable to be used on the sheave.
  • Overall diameter of the sheave

Next you’ll have to do some very simple math. Firstly, to figure out how deep the groove in the sheave should be: (rope/cable diameter) x 1.75. This will give you the minimum groove depth you need, but in most cases just round to make it a little deeper and give yourself a safety margin. For example, if your sheave is 15″ in total diameter and you have a 1″ diameter cable. That is 1″ x 1.75 = for a required depth of 1.75″. But for the sake of safety margin you can make this an even 2″. The inner diameter of the sheave is now 11″. Please note that for the inner diameter you are taking that required groove depth x 2.

The last thing you need to consider is the thickness of the sheave. For most smaller sheaves just go with a 1/4″ wall thickness, these are the “shoulders” of the sheave on either side of the rope groove. So, for example, if your rope groove is 1″ wide, then you add another 1/2″ for the walls (wall thickness x 2) so you would have an overall thickness of 1.5″. The last thing to touch on here is the radius of the rope groove (the curve of the groove the rope sits in). this is almost always 30 degree and in rare cases, 45 degrees. Run with 30 degrees as a standard.

There are some guidelines for figuring out parameters for more advanced sheaves such as webbing or thickening the hub and we’ll discuss those next time in “Sheave Design: Advanced”.

For help with your sheave applications and to purchase sheave materials please contact Redwood Plastics.

 

We have an unspoken rule we’re about to break here. This blog is about connecting the “do it yourself” (DIY) community with industrial plastics. Plastics that are not very well known outside of their specific industries, but offer a lot to the home handywoman or handyman. Industrial plastics are also known as “engineering” plastics and are a separate grade of materials than what makes up most consumer products. But we were trying to find a new application for summer and stumbled on something with “commodity” plastics, IE. plastic bottles, we wanted to share. Pretty sure this application would be difficult to do with the usual industrial grade sheet/rod/tube…And hey, it promotes plastics recycling! Always a good thing.

It’s a home-made “air cooler” using nothing but Sprite bottles, tubing, a drill, a few pieces of wire, a glue gun, and an oscillating fan. We haven’t tested it (like most applications we highlight) so don’t take our word for how good it works. It’s a short video we wanted to share as North America starts to experience the heat waves that hit with late spring and summer. One change we’re confidant in recommending; however, is the use of a 2 liter bottle as the drain bottle strapped to the fan (you’ll see in the video) as it makes little sense to have two one liter bottles both drain into another one liter bottle. Based on the volumes at play, that would result in a bit too many times having to get up and drain! The full video is below and is about four minutes long, hopefully it works for you!