Posts Tagged ‘PVC’

This is a really neat project with materials available from any hardware store. We found a video of a “do-it-yourselfer” (Alan) in Texas on YouTube who made a simple, yet rugged, sprinkler out of PVC pipe. Really not much is needed here in the way of materials and you likely could get it all in one stop to the hardware store: PVC pipe and caps, a female socket for the hose, the sprinkler, and PVC glue. The nice thing about Alan’s design is that it works better than many traditional sprinklers. You know, the ones that oscillate back and forth with separate streams of water? In this case, the sprinkler seems to even cover 360 degrees of space providing excellent coverage. If it’s an inexpensive build that works better than store bought alternatives, you know you’ve got a good idea on your hands!

 

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PVC tubing is one of the least expensive, most accessible plastics the Do-It-Yourself community has access to. It’s no surprise then that the plastic pops up in so many amazing applications. Last year we highlighted some projects like the PVC kids sprinkler and outdoor movie screen as well as the PVC peddle kart. But just take a look at some of these other creative applications!

PVC Bow:

PVC Bow

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.instructables.com/id/PVC-Bow-2/

 

PVC Scooter:

PVC scooter

 

 

 

 

 

PVC Dog Bed:

Dawg

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://primedforsurvival.com/post-b/

 

PVC Hydroponic Garden:

pvc-hydroponic-planter-728x546

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://primedforsurvival.com/post-b/

 

PVC Director’s Chair (no saveable image available, click link for pictures): http://s577.photobucket.com/user/LazyPup/media/frogschaircropped1.jpg.html

 

 

Choosing Your Plastic

Posted: March 8, 2016 in Education
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The question comes up a lot in the DIY community: “I am planning to make _______ so what plastic do I need?” The good news is selecting a plastic for your application is very similar to how heavy industry would select a plastic for their projects. You need to select a plastic based on certain properties it gives you, not some sort of bias to what you “heard” worked – and especially not based on color!

So when thinking about your what you need for your application consider the properties of these plastics:

 

UHMW Polyethylene:

-Slick, low-coefficient of friction

-Good wear properties

-Good abrasion properties

-Thermoformable (at home)

 

Polyurethane:

-Elastomer: will regain its shape after depression (excellent as mallet heads)

-Excellent cut & tear resistance

 

Nylon:

-Bearings (takes up to 4000PSI)

-Wear plates

 

Tuffkast:

-Replaces nylon in cold operating environments or where impact is a concern

 

Acetal:

-Small parts, replacing metal

-Where machinability is key, can hold tight tolerances

-Replacing nylon in “wet” applications

 

PVC:

-Anywhere a “frame” is needed.

 

Industrial laminates/Phenolic/Micarta:

-Mechanical or electrical applications

-High load bearing

 

“DIY” PVC Karts

Posted: December 31, 2015 in PVC
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We’re always looking up creative ways people use plastics in their home projects and one application we stumbled on was the “PVC Karts”. These are “Go Kart” type vehicles, usually with an electrical or pedal motor, that are made out of a frame of PVC piping. The elaborate designs these inventors can make out of what is essentially just pipe and joiners is awesome! What’s even better is that the DIY community involved in these karts seem so willing to share their information and designs. We found a Youtube video on one such kart that seems to rip along really quick and also a few websites we’ve found that seem to have useful information.

As always when we share information like this we have to put the disclaimer that we are not recommending or endorsing any of these applications. They could be unsafe, so always, do your own research and build at your own risk.

A couple websites:

http://robertklee10.tripod.com/shock_pictures.htm

http://www.pvcplans.com/kartcross.htm

A Youtube movie:

Sometimes here we get a little focused on the different plastics and helping you with your applications that you’re already working on. But how about a few ideas on what plastic projects you could work on using industrial plastic? Just maybe this will get your creative juices flowing…

-Hockey fan? How about a synthetic ice surface using UHMW or HDPE?

-Build your own twin-wall polycarbonate greenhouse

-Drill holes in PVC piping and affix to a garden hose in order to make a great summer water attraction for the kids

-Make home saw guides made out of Micarta

-Line your mud room with FRP wall panel to protect from grime and damage

-Replace your wooden dock with a mini-mesh FRP grating surface

-Cut and affix UHMW strips to your snowmobile steering rails or dog sled

-Make a sunroof or solarium out of twin-wall polycarbonate

-Secure your sailboat rigging with Micarta grade CE washers or blocks

-Machine at home pulleys for a home robot or model using natural nylon

-Affix UHMW to the bottom of your shallow running boat to protect from impact

-Make a bolus game “goal frame” out of PVC pipe

-Line your dog house or other animal pen with HDPE puckboard to protect the walls and the pets

For help with your “DIY’er” project’s materials contact Redwood Plastics

 

Rover1

 

So…You have a project. You’ve decided that you’re going to use “plastic” for it. Ok, which kind?

Sometimes it’s obvious. Plastic “do-it-yourselfer” applications that involve piping probably involve PVC since it’s so readily available and inexpensive compared to the alternatives. Same goes for acrylic or polycarbonate – the two primary clear (glazing) plastics. But sometimes there are more choices especially as the application becomes more vague. Common plastic applications taken on by amateurs include wear strips, bumpers, sheaves, pulleys, wheels, shock absorbers, ramps, bushings and everything else you can think of. With the array of industrial plastics available these days – how do you select the right plastic?

Well, the easiest way is just to ask. A reputable distributor will be able to take your information and make a recommendation; however, the more information you bring to the representative – the more he or she can help you. Many of the questions you ask should be the same as any of our industrial customers would ask. And we can help you out right here!

Questions you should know the answer to before approaching the plastic distributor:

What is the project?

What is the operating environment? (temperature, any chemical or weather exposure – exposure to UV light is of special concern)

What load or pressure does it bear?

What properties are important in your application? (stiffness, ease of machining, low friction, high friction, etc)

What is your budget?

Based on that information we can help you select a material that will suit your project’s needs.

For more information contact Redwood Plastics.

 

 

 

 

PVC Truck Tent

Posted: July 25, 2014 in PVC
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Yes – we write about PVC a lot here! The reason for that is that it’s just so accessible, so easy to use and work with as well as affordable. The combination of availability, flexibility and price means PVC applications for the “do-it-yourselfer” are easy to find.

Anyways…It’s summer, officially now. Camping is a favorite past-time of many people but if you have a larger group it can get pretty claustrophobic in those tents. We found this video on YouTube of a guy who made a truck tent for his pickup. He lists the price as $55.00 total…And $20.00 of that was for the mattress! Most of it is just PVC pipe and fittings. The only problem is that at the time of the video they had not tested it with rain yet.

Take a look…You’ll need to skip around to about halfway through the video to see the tent set up: